For two years, a  EUROfusion grant has supported Geri Papp’s work at the IPP. His research on “Runaway Electrons” has brought fusion research a step closer to solving one of the mysteries of fusion plasma. The scientist has recently been awarded with the Károly Simonyi Memorial Plaque and Prize of the Hungarian Nuclear Society. Picture: EUROfusion

For two years, a EUROfusion grant has supported Geri Papp’s work at the IPP. His research on “Runaway Electrons” has brought fusion research a step closer to solving one of the mysteries of fusion plasma. The scientist has recently been awarded with the Károly Simonyi Memorial Plaque and Prize of the Hungarian
Nuclear Society. Picture: EUROfusion

If you’re the smartest person in the room, you’re in the wrong room. – that was basically what departing EUROfusion fellow Gergely ‘Geri’ Papp enjoyed greatly. As a rather young scientist, he was able to work with experienced fusion researchers who have thus always had something new to teach him.
In order to enhance its training and education activities, EUROfusion has allocated 16 % of its budget to support fusion-related PhD and pre-doctoral studies. This investment nurtures the next generation of fusion researchers.

In fact, the fusion community cannot start training ITER’s future staff early enough. The ITER Organization, amongst others, already reaches out to school children. During the “ITER robots” final in May, more than 500 French pupils will be competing against each other while solving virtual tasks for the biggest experiment to come. The students will have been learning about ITER for six months. In addition to this, they have enjoyed practical lessons on how to programme a robot– a win-win situation both for the largest experiment to come and for the schools.

CCFE engineer Alexandrine Kántor became quite famous during the recent debate on “Brexatom”. Since the UK Government has declared that it intends to leave Euratom, the French fusion expert spoke out in support of the rights of EU citizens living in Great Britain. The magazine “Nature” quoted her and even the House of Lords listened to her strident statement. Picture: © Copyright protected by United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority

CCFE engineer Alexandrine Kántor became quite famous during the recent debate on “Brexatom”. Since the UK Government has declared that it intends to leave Euratom, the French fusion expert spoke out in
support of the rights of EU citizens living in Great Britain. The magazine “Nature” quoted her and even the House of Lords listened to her strident statement. Picture: © Copyright protected by United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority

Mohamad Haithm Alnhas Humse is not a fusion scientist but a Syrian refugee with skills in the metal working industry. He and his brother found new jobs at the IPP workshop in Greifswald after German research institutes decided to open up positions to immigrants. Picture: EUROfusion

Mohamad Haithm Alnhas Humse is not a fusion scientist but a Syrian refugee with skills in the metal working industry. He and his brother found new jobs at the IPP workshop in Greifswald after German research institutes decided to open up positions to immigrants. Picture: EUROfusion

ITER is obviously quite well supported by the European community. This certainly applies to EUROfusion’s current experimental campaign which connects the research at (now) four tokamaks, one stellarator and of course JET, the largest fusion experiment in the world.

The future of JET is currently unclear since it is a European experiment located on British soil. 350 international scientists on site are currently contributing to the tokamak. The UK Government is preparing to leave the European Union, including the Euratom treaty. Although Science Minister Jo Johnson has said that JET’s unique position should not be compromised, CCFE engineer and French citizen Alexandrine Kántor, is still worried.

Learning something fresh and overcoming obstacles is, as has been said, a key feature of EUROfusion, even in places you would not expect it. In IPP’s workshop in Greifswald, three refugees have started a new life. Struggling at first with language and culture, both the instructor and his apprentices have succeeded in their tasks.