Posted on: 1st October 2012

A new chapter in JET’s career is opening, as a significant international collaboration with India gets underway.  The project is to design and build prototype ELM control coils for JET, and is being almost entirely funded and carried out by the Indian ITER partners.

The project leader on the EFDA side is Dr Christopher Lowry: “The coils are vital to demonstrating a fully integrated ITER scenario on JET,” he says, “and such collaboration is the future of JET – as a training ground for all the ITER partners.”

Two teams of Indian scientists and engineers from the Institute for Plasma Reseach (IPR) in Gandhinagar, in the west of India, have arrived at JET in recent times to begin work in earnest.

The six-strong conceptual design team arrived in mid-September for a six month stay. Team leader Ravi Prakash, who also heads the Remote Handling and Robotics Technology Development Division at IPR, is enthusiastic about the project. “It is an exciting project, ELM mitigation and suppression is leading edge technology in tokamaks!” he says. “It’s inspiring to work with the remote handling system.” His team, consisting of analysts Manoah Stephen Manuelraj and Pramit Dutta, CAD designers Vishnubhai Prajapati and Kanubhai Rathod and design engineer Prosenjit Santra, is responsible for the conceptual design of all 32 coils, including support structures, housing, interfacing with other JET subsystems, assembly and integration. Moreover, because the coils will be assembled inside the vessel the team needs to take into consideration any remote handling requirements, such as designing bespoke tooling.

The ELM coil prototype team using practical techniques to understand the design challenges. From left Kirit Vasava, Mahesh Ghate, Subrata Pradhan and Ananya Kundu.

The ELM coil prototype team using practical techniques to understand the design challenges. From left Kirit Vasava, Mahesh Ghate, Subrata Pradhan and Ananya Kundu.

The second team, which has the goal of building a prototype coil, is Subrata Pradhan (team leader), Mahesh Ghate (engineer), Ananya Kundu (analyst) and Kirit Vasava (draughtsman). Although much of the work will be carried out at the IPR in India, the team kickstarted their project with a month long visit to JET, arriving in mid-August.

“The exposure to the JET machine is an important aspect” says Mr Pradhan. His team spent the visit familiarising themselves with the preconceptual design and preparing preliminary models for the prototype coil, which it is scheduled to deliver mid 2013.

Despite the many JET systems that they need to become familiar with the teams have found the information they need easily. “The JET team has done things very systematically. We can reach the top expert very quickly for clarifications and discussions” says Mr Prakash. “Experience that has been gained through the years is available to the next generation through a carefully designed knowledge base – there is no data loss!”

The conceptual design of the ELM coils, associated support structures, in-vessel components and remote handling integration is expected to be completed by March next year.